How does it work

Le Verre de Vin Box

How does it work?

Introduction to Le Verre de Vin

Le Verre de Vin technology effectively preserves wine without any risk to it’s subtle structure by removing the oxygen to a precisely controlled level.

View the video clip to see just how quick and easy it is to use!

Preserving still wines with Le Verre de Vin

Still Wines

Preserving champagnes with Le Verre de Vin

Sparkling Wines

The technology behind Le Verre de Vin – still wine preservation

Wine begins to oxidise as soon as the cork is removed. By removing the oxygen to a precisely controlled level Le Verre de Vin technology effectively preserves wine without any risk to its subtle structure.

Still wine preservation takes just 2 to 5 seconds (depending upon the amount of wine remaining) during which time a precisely controlled vacuum is created within the bottle.

Precise control of the vacuum level is essential to ensure that the maximum period of preservation is achieved without any damage to the subtle structure of the wine.

If insufficient air is removed from the bottle the wine will continue to oxidise, by removing just too much air the negative pressure will draw the delicate esters and phenols from the wine, detrimentally affecting the bouquet and ‘deadening’ the taste.

The technology behind Le Verre de Vin – Champagne preservation

To successfully preserve opened bottles of sparkling wine and champagne, two key areas have to be addressed; loss of ‘sparkle’ and oxidation. Simply replacing the bottle’s original cork with a ‘clamp effect’ stopper will do little or nothing to slow bubble loss and the wine will continue to release its natural carbon dioxide (CO2) until a pressure equilibrium is achieved within the bottle (and oxidation begins).

Preventing release of the naturally occurring CO2 is key to ensuring that the fizz stays locked in the wine and any issue of oxidation is eliminated.

Le Verre de Vin technology operates by introducing a precisely calibrated infusion of CO2 into a Champagne/sparkling wine bottle, thereby creating a pressure equilibrium and preventing any escape of CO2 from the wine itself.

A valved stopper is placed in the bottle and clipped in place (replicating the ‘wire around the original cork); the stopper retains the CO2 under pressure within the bottle and ‘locks in’ the natural fizz.  The process ensures that bubble loss is prevented and maximum preservation is achieved.